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Health and Human Services HeadlinesHealth and Human Services Headlines


Health and Safety PSAs from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Related to Hurricane Irene

Fri, 26 Aug 2011 09:43:35 EDT
Because hurricane damage is a public safety issue, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners can stay safe and cope. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS, covers points such as preparing for a hurricane, evacuation, staying safe in a home, emergency wound care, food and drug safety, and avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out. The PSAs tell people what they need to know before, during and after a hurricane, so they are for spot use. The feed also includes TV crawls ready to be run across the bottom of screens, and text for cell phone alert messages. The PSAs on the Internet link below are to sound files in .MP3 format as well as matching live-read texts. There are matching TV PSAs for many spots contact Ira Dreyfuss at ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov or (202) 401-5920. Details...

Flood-Related PSAs from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Mon, 03 May 2010 14:13:02 EDT
Stations, because flooding is a current public safety issue, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners can stay safe and cope with the problems and stresses of flooding. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS, covers points such as driving in flooded areas, keeping your children safe from flooding, avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out, and preventing mold. The PSAs tell people what they need to know during and after a flood, so they are for spot use. The PSAs on the Internet link below are to sound files in .MP3 format (male or female voices, and some in Spanish) as well as matching live-read texts. For TV, there are bottom-of-the-screen crawls for immediate use. There also are matching TV PSAs for many of these spots. The TV PSAs are available by contacting Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The email is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov, and the telephone number is (202) 401-5920. Here is a link to the Internet site where you can download the PSAs and view the TV spots. http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/psa/ Details...

Severe Winter Weather PSAs from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Wed, 10 Feb 2010 19:33:01 EST
Because severe winter weather can be a public health issue, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners can stay safe and cope with the problems and stresses of the weather. The advice is approved by public health experts from HHS' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The topics of the PSAs cover such points as recognizing and preventing carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as hypothermia and frostbite. The PSAs are in live-read script, .MP3 audio and TV formats. All are 30 seconds in length. Here is a link to the Internet site where you can download the scripts and audio of the winter weather-related PSAs, and preview the TV PSAs: http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/psa To receive a broadcast quality copy of the TV PSAs, contact Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The e-mail is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov. Details...

Hurricane-Related Messages for Texas Broadcasters from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Thu, 11 Sep 2008 10:12:46 EDT
Stations, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners can stay safe and cope in the event of a hurricane. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS, covers points such as preparing for a hurricane, evacuation, staying safe in a home, emergency wound care, food and drug safety, and avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out. The PSAs tell people what they need to know before, during and after a hurricane, so they are for spot use. New: text for TV crawls, ready to be run across the bottom of screens. The PSAs on the Web link below are to sound files in .MP3 format, including some in Spanish) as well as matching live-read texts. There are matching TV PSAs for many of these spots. They are available by contacting Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The email is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov, and the telephone number is 202-401-5920. Details...

Hurricane-Related Messages for Texas Broadcasters from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:52:30 EDT
Stations, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners can stay safe and cope in the event of a hurricane. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS, covers points such as preparing for a hurricane, evacuation, staying safe in a home, emergency wound care, food and drug safety, and avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out. The PSAs tell people what they need to know before, during and after a hurricane, so they are for spot use. New for this feed: text for TV crawls, ready to be run across the bottom of screens. The PSAs on the Web link below are to sound files in .MP3 format (male or female voices, and some in Spanish) as well as matching live-read texts. There are matching TV PSAs for many of these spots. They are available by contacting Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The email is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov, and Details...

Flood-Related PSAs for Missouri, Iowa and Indiana from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tue, 17 Jun 2008 12:40:53 EDT
Stations, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how listeners can stay safe and cope with flooding. These practical tips are meant for use if there is flooding. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS, covers points such as driving in flooded areas, keeping your children safe from flooding, avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out, and preventing mold. The PSAs tell people what they need to know during and after a flood, so they are for spot use. The PSAs on the Web link below are to sound files in .MP3 format (male or female voices, and some in Spanish) as well as matching live-read texts. There are matching TV PSAs for many of these spots. They are available by contacting Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The email is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov, and the telephone number is 202-401-5920. Details...

Heat-Related PSAs for the Washington, D.C., area

Fri, 06 Jun 2008 17:49:42 EDT
Stations, because heat is a public health issue in the Washington, D.C., area, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers two 30-second PSAs, in recorded .MP3 and live-read script format. The PSAs tell listeners how to cope with heat during a power outage and give general stay-cool tips. For more information, contact Ira Dreyfuss at ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov. The PSAs can be downloaded at this Web address: Details...

HHS Public Health PSAs Related to Flooding

Thu, 20 Mar 2008 13:58:58 EDT
Because flooding is a current public safety issue, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how your listeners or viewers can stay safe and cope with flooding. The advice, all approved by public health experts from HHS' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, covers points such as driving in flooded areas, keeping your children safe from flooding, avoiding carbon monoxide poisoning when power is out, and preventing mold. The PSAs tell people what they need to know during and after a flood, so they are for spot use. The PSAs on the Web link below are to sound files in .MP3 format (male or female voices, and some in Spanish) as well as matching live-read texts. There are matching TV PSAs for many of these spots. They are available by contacting Ira Dreyfuss at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The email is ira.dreyfuss@hhs.gov, and the telephone number is (202) 401-5920. Details...

Winter Weather PSAs for California, from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Fri, 04 Jan 2008 18:59:09 EST
Because cold weather and icy conditions can endanger the health of people outside in it, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how to stay safe. The advice, approved by public health experts from HHS' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tell how to recognize and prevent injury from hypothermia and frostbite. The PSAs, in 30-second scripts and .MP3 recorded versions, are for spot use. The Web link below is to the sound files as well as the matching live-read texts. Details...

Winter Storm Safety: From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:22:03 EST
Areas with snow-ice emergencies and power outages: Public health advice from HHS' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, available on the Internet, includes how to cope with loss of power and how to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning from generators, grills and other devices. Details...

Why has the summer of 2012 proved so hospitable to the West Nile virus and the mosquitoes that carry it

Tue, 21 Aug 2012 10:00:41 EDT
A mild winter allowed more mosquitoes than usual to survive, while the unusually high temperatures this summer further increased their numbers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that as of August 14, 2012, more than 40 states have reported West Nile virus (WNV) infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. A total of 693 cases of West Nile virus disease in people, including 26 deaths, have been reported to CDC. The CDC has posted a fact sheet containing important information that can help you recognize and prevent West Nile virus. Details...

Flooding Safety Material for California, from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tue, 11 Dec 2007 22:41:52 EST
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers 30-second PSAs on how to stay safe in areas hit by flooding. The advice, approved by public health experts from HHS' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, covers such areas as driving and protecting children. The PSAs, in 30-second scripts and .MP3 recorded versions, are for spot use. The Web link below is to the sound files as well as the matching live-read texts. Details...

30-Second PSA Script on Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Tue, 11 Dec 2007 00:29:11 EST
Radio and TV Stations in Areas with Power Outages due to Snow and Ice: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services offers this 30-second Script to advise listeners on how to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning from generators, gas grills and other devices: This is an important message from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. During a power outage, never use generators, grills, or other gasoline-, propane-, or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, garage, or carport or near doors, windows, or vents. They produce carbon monoxide, an odorless, colorless gas that kills more than 500 Americans each year. If your home is damaged, stay with friends or family or in a shelter. To learn more, call the CDC at 800-CDC-INFO. (Audio recorded versions in .MP3 format in English and Spanish are available on the Internet.) Details...




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